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Archive for the ‘Hospice’ Category

My last post – a death in the family – has had an amazing ride over the past five days! After I posted it on Facebook, I tried to “boost” it to reach more people and for some bizarre reason, FB deemed it to be unsuitable, objectionable content – they refused the ad and removed the message from Facebook! Magically, it reappeared a day later (perhaps because I appealed, though I doubt it!) And since then, an amazing number of people have read the post about my aunt’s last days. I am enormously gratified by the response and so glad my story reached so many people. Thanks to all of you!

It’s been a busy week, because this is National Hospice Palliative Care week. I participated on a webinar for the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association on living well, right to the end. Here’s the link to the show (I’m the first speaker, right after the introduction). I hope you enjoy it!

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When I first started volunteering in a residential hospice 15 years ago, most people I encountered had never even heard of a hospice. When I told them it was a place that provided end of life care for dying patients and their families, they looked at me with a strange combination of horror and disbelief.

“You must be a saint!” people would say, stepping back slightly to avoid the glare from my halo. “I could NEVER do what you do,” they would add, though they actually had no idea what I did.

“Don’t you find it depressing?” was their closing question, perhaps their way of explaining why they could never take my place.

“Actually, it’s the most hopeful part of my week,” I would say, ready to offer an explanation to the questions that never came.

Fifteen years later, people are still a little surprised when I say I volunteer in a hospice. But instead of distancing themselves by putting me on a saintly pedestal, more often than not they ask me what exactly what a hospice volunteer does. They listen with interest as I describe a typical shift, which can involve everything from helping to give a bed bath to making poached eggs and toast, brewing pots of Tim Horton’s coffee, and listening to a grieving family member anticipating the loss of her sister.

Our work is both hands-on and open-hearted, I explain. I’m a short-order chief cook and bottle washer, a hand holder, and a singer of hymns. I’m a listener and a tour guide, a companion, and a witness. And I never know which among those roles I’ll play on any given day.

More often than not, people listen intently as I explain the nature of our work. While some still assure me that they could never do what I do, many say they might think of doing something like this, once they have the time.

I like to think that my being a hospice volunteer – and talking and writing about my work – is playing a small part in opening up discussions about death and dying in my community and beyond. Certainly I encounter more and more like-minded people on Facebook, at community gatherings, even at the movies. I believe that we are opening up essential conversations about how we want to live our lives and how we would like to approach our deaths.

As always, I’d love to hear what readers think about my writing here – I hope if you find it meaningful, you’ll share this blog with others, through your social media connections and elsewhere. I hope you’ll join me in these essential conversations about living and dying.

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Today is March 8th, International Women’s Day. So it seems appropriate to share this article about Dame Cicely Saunders, the founder of St. Christopher’s House in London and a pioneer in the modern hospice movement. Many people involved in hospice palliative care work in Canada and elsewhere were inspired by her work and her life. Dr. Balfour Mount (the Montreal physician who established the first palliative care unit and coined the term palliative care) and Dr. John Seely (a champion of palliative care in Ottawa and friend and colleague of Dr. Mount) both visited Cicely Saunders in London and saw first hand the importance of her work.

So today, I am grateful for Dame Cicely Saunders and the many many women who came before us, who paged the way for our work today, and shone a light on the possibilities of the future.

http://endoflifestudies.academicblogs.co.uk/celebrating-the-life-of-cicely-saunders-on-international-womens-day-by-david-clark/

 

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pastoral-care-workshop-katherine-arnup

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I want to share the link to a fabulous article about the Zen Hospice in San Francisco and its amazing Executive Director, B J Miller. I had the chance to visit the hospice in 2005 and to spend time talking with one of the staff members about their approach. I will never forget our saying –  almost in unison –  that “dying is a spiritual activity.” We both smiled at the simple truth held in that phrase. Far too often in Western society, death has become a medical event, removed from life.

Read this story to the end – it’s enormously moving and for me, exemplifies what hospice care is all about.

 

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Before I start this post, I want to share with you an amazing podcast from the BBC that I came across recently. Here’s the link:

We need to talk about death

You can listen to it on your computer, or download the podcast and keep up with all the episodes as they are posted. There are two at the moment and they are truly wonderful. The instigator and narrator is a wonderful British woman in her 80s. She’s gathered a small panel of “experts” – people who have thought a great deal about death during their lives. The first episode talks about the importance of facing our fears of death and dying. The second focusses on pain. I wish I could sit down with all of you and listen to it together – and then talk about our own thoughts, feelings, and reactions. We seem to have so few places to talk about such things.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ve probably noticed that I haven’t posted in nearly two months. I could tell you that I’ve been busy, that life’s gotten in the way, that I’ve been working hard on other things, and, while all that would be true, it’s not the real reason I’ve been silent.

The real reason is because I’ve been struggling to find the meaning in the work I am doing as a hospice volunteer. It’s not that I’ve lost the calling. That’s something I’ve felt since I first walked into the hospice where I still volunteer. It’s something I’ve known since my sister told me “You’re going to be an expert at this by the time you’re done with me,” shortly before she died. While I certainly didn’t want to learn how to be with dying from my sister, she was, as always, an excellent teacher.

I feel honoured to be able to help dying people and their families. I treasure the conversations we have had over the past 15 years – and I hold deep within my heart the memory of the people with whom I’ve sat as they took their last breath.

But increasingly – slowly over time and, of late, more frequently – I’ve found myself confronted with more and more rules and restrictions, tasks and prohibitions. Seldom do I seem to have the time to sit with someone who is dying. Or to retreat to the sun room to have a chat with a family member who is having a hard time. Instead, I’m in the kitchen, loading the dishwasher (or waiting for it to be finished!), rushing to answer the phone or fix someone’s lunch.

I have never minded the quotidian tasks that are part and parcel of volunteering – I’ve become quite the expert at making jello, grilled cheese sandwiches, scrambled eggs (though not poached, after all these years). Those things have been part and parcel of the services we do. My struggle has been that we are faced with an increasing number of rules about how things must be done and what we must do to the point where I wonder if “being with dying” is actually part of our “job.”

Perhaps you’ll think I’m complaining – or being unrealistic about the degree to which organizations must change when they advance from their “pioneering phase.” But when I listen to people talk as they do on the BBC program mentioned above, I am reminded once again of the reason why I became a hospice volunteer – and I mourn what seems lost in the process of  growing, consolidating, and institutionalizing.

From my casual conversations during shift changes and with friends, I know I’m not alone in these feelings. I wonder if any of you readers out there might feel the same.

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Last Thursday, October 13th, was International Hospice Palliative Care day. And in Canada, this is national Hospice Palliative Care month. Each week, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association is reminding us of the importance of talking about death and dying, advance care directives, and the need for access to hospice palliative care.

Last Friday, I gave a keynote address to the Bereavement Ontario Network at Geneva Park near Orillia. It was wonderful to have the change to talk about the history of death and dying and current and future trends in death, dying, and bereavement. (In case you were wondering where I had disappeared to, I was madly writing my talk right up until the deadline!)

Before I head off to my hospice shift today, I wanted to share this article, written by an Irish woman, about she and her family’s failure to talk to their mother about her impending death. It’s a great reminder to all of us to talk about what we and the people we love want at the end of our lives (and about the fact that death can happen at any time, not just many many years from now when we are very old!)

‘I regret not talking to my mother about her death, don’t do the same thing’

Talk to the people you love – your children, your parents, your siblings, your friends. Don’t wait until it’s too late!

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