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Posts Tagged ‘hospice volunteering’

I’m excited to see so many visitors to the hospice volunteering blog this week. I’m grateful to Hospice Care Ottawa for including the blog in their monthly newsletter for volunteers and staff. I hope that many readers will choose to follow the blog – that’s the easiest way to ensure that you keep receiving it on a regular basis. I don’t post a great deal – at most once a week, but often less, as life carries me away to other pursuits. There’s a button on the page that says “follow‘ – just click on that, give your email address, and you’ll get a message each time I post.

I have another reason to thank Hospice Care Ottawa – they graciously hosted the latest Death Cafe at the May Court Hospice on Monday. We had a great turnout – and from the buzz in the room I could tell that people were engaged in lively conversation. I know I had a great time with the three other people at my table!

I’ll keep you posted on other upcoming activities – here in Ottawa and elsewhere. In the meantime, feel free to share this blog, and to read the archived posts on this site. Thank  you!

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When I first started volunteering in a residential hospice 15 years ago, most people I encountered had never even heard of a hospice. When I told them it was a place that provided end of life care for dying patients and their families, they looked at me with a strange combination of horror and disbelief.

“You must be a saint!” people would say, stepping back slightly to avoid the glare from my halo. “I could NEVER do what you do,” they would add, though they actually had no idea what I did.

“Don’t you find it depressing?” was their closing question, perhaps their way of explaining why they could never take my place.

“Actually, it’s the most hopeful part of my week,” I would say, ready to offer an explanation to the questions that never came.

Fifteen years later, people are still a little surprised when I say I volunteer in a hospice. But instead of distancing themselves by putting me on a saintly pedestal, more often than not they ask me what exactly what a hospice volunteer does. They listen with interest as I describe a typical shift, which can involve everything from helping to give a bed bath to making poached eggs and toast, brewing pots of Tim Horton’s coffee, and listening to a grieving family member anticipating the loss of her sister.

Our work is both hands-on and open-hearted, I explain. I’m a short-order chief cook and bottle washer, a hand holder, and a singer of hymns. I’m a listener and a tour guide, a companion, and a witness. And I never know which among those roles I’ll play on any given day.

More often than not, people listen intently as I explain the nature of our work. While some still assure me that they could never do what I do, many say they might think of doing something like this, once they have the time.

I like to think that my being a hospice volunteer – and talking and writing about my work – is playing a small part in opening up discussions about death and dying in my community and beyond. Certainly I encounter more and more like-minded people on Facebook, at community gatherings, even at the movies. I believe that we are opening up essential conversations about how we want to live our lives and how we would like to approach our deaths.

As always, I’d love to hear what readers think about my writing here – I hope if you find it meaningful, you’ll share this blog with others, through your social media connections and elsewhere. I hope you’ll join me in these essential conversations about living and dying.

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It’s 2017, so they tell me, though I have been laid up in bed since late December with a nasty virus, and have trouble remembering which day of the week it is.

In a few days it will be 20 years since my sister Carol was diagnosed with the virulent cancer that would take her life 6 months later, on July 4, 1997. I had just begun a well deserved and much needed sabbatical and was busy making plans for a research trip when my sister called to say that the cancer was back.

“Fuck, Fuck, FUCK,” I said, when she told me.

“Don’t say that,” she said.

“But it’s just not fair! You’ve done so well! Fuck, fuck, fuck,” I said again, the only words that seemed to capture the extent of my anger and grief and shock.

“Don’t say that,” she said. “It just makes it harder for me.”

“OK,” I agreed. “I’ll be on the first train tomorrow to see you.”

And so it began. The 6 month “journey” in cancerland – through endless visits to doctors and hospitals, CT scans and MRIs, biopsies, and surgery. Vomiting and K-basins. Fear. And always pain. And finally death.

So many of the details of those six months are still vivid in my mind and my heart. The endless waiting for results, the parade of PSWs and “sitters.” Dozens upon dozens of phone calls on pay phones, in the days long before cell phones. And countless conversations with Carol about what she wanted and needed. I would have done anything I could have for her. And in the end it was never enough.

Shortly after she died, I began to tell people that I had been transformed by Carol’s death. I didn’t really know what it meant, but I knew it was true. I was no longer running away from death. Four years later, I would begin what became my 15 year journey as a hospice volunteer. “My sister works through me,” I would tell friends when I first began my volunteer work with dying people and their families. Sometimes I could almost hear her telling me, “Slow down. There’s nothing you have to do. Just listen to their stories.” And I did.

And I still do, all these 20 years later. I also write and talk and speak at conferences and churches and meeting halls. I look for opportunities to share my book about caring for my sister and my elderly parents, in hopes that I can help others who are facing this challenging time in their lives.

When I first began volunteering at hospice, friends would look at me strangely as I would wax eloquent about my volunteering. Some thought it morbid, others that I was courting depression in being with dying people week after week. Few would believe me when I told them my time at hospice was the most hopeful part of my week.

More often now, people ask me what I do at hospice – what it’s like giving care to dying people, and talking with their families. More and more, of course, friends and strangers alike have experienced the death of someone they love. Or they are watching their aging parents coming to terms with their loss of independence and failing health. Perhaps they have received a difficult diagnosis themselves. Now they too want to talk about death and dying.

And so I will continue to write, here and elsewhere, about life and death. I’ll read the latest books on the subject from the library, and watch movies about “d and d.” I’ll continue to give talks wherever I can,  and I’ll look forward to hearing other people’s stories.

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I want to share the link to a fabulous article about the Zen Hospice in San Francisco and its amazing Executive Director, B J Miller. I had the chance to visit the hospice in 2005 and to spend time talking with one of the staff members about their approach. I will never forget our saying –  almost in unison –  that “dying is a spiritual activity.” We both smiled at the simple truth held in that phrase. Far too often in Western society, death has become a medical event, removed from life.

Read this story to the end – it’s enormously moving and for me, exemplifies what hospice care is all about.

 

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Before I start this post, I want to share with you an amazing podcast from the BBC that I came across recently. Here’s the link:

We need to talk about death

You can listen to it on your computer, or download the podcast and keep up with all the episodes as they are posted. There are two at the moment and they are truly wonderful. The instigator and narrator is a wonderful British woman in her 80s. She’s gathered a small panel of “experts” – people who have thought a great deal about death during their lives. The first episode talks about the importance of facing our fears of death and dying. The second focusses on pain. I wish I could sit down with all of you and listen to it together – and then talk about our own thoughts, feelings, and reactions. We seem to have so few places to talk about such things.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ve probably noticed that I haven’t posted in nearly two months. I could tell you that I’ve been busy, that life’s gotten in the way, that I’ve been working hard on other things, and, while all that would be true, it’s not the real reason I’ve been silent.

The real reason is because I’ve been struggling to find the meaning in the work I am doing as a hospice volunteer. It’s not that I’ve lost the calling. That’s something I’ve felt since I first walked into the hospice where I still volunteer. It’s something I’ve known since my sister told me “You’re going to be an expert at this by the time you’re done with me,” shortly before she died. While I certainly didn’t want to learn how to be with dying from my sister, she was, as always, an excellent teacher.

I feel honoured to be able to help dying people and their families. I treasure the conversations we have had over the past 15 years – and I hold deep within my heart the memory of the people with whom I’ve sat as they took their last breath.

But increasingly – slowly over time and, of late, more frequently – I’ve found myself confronted with more and more rules and restrictions, tasks and prohibitions. Seldom do I seem to have the time to sit with someone who is dying. Or to retreat to the sun room to have a chat with a family member who is having a hard time. Instead, I’m in the kitchen, loading the dishwasher (or waiting for it to be finished!), rushing to answer the phone or fix someone’s lunch.

I have never minded the quotidian tasks that are part and parcel of volunteering – I’ve become quite the expert at making jello, grilled cheese sandwiches, scrambled eggs (though not poached, after all these years). Those things have been part and parcel of the services we do. My struggle has been that we are faced with an increasing number of rules about how things must be done and what we must do to the point where I wonder if “being with dying” is actually part of our “job.”

Perhaps you’ll think I’m complaining – or being unrealistic about the degree to which organizations must change when they advance from their “pioneering phase.” But when I listen to people talk as they do on the BBC program mentioned above, I am reminded once again of the reason why I became a hospice volunteer – and I mourn what seems lost in the process of  growing, consolidating, and institutionalizing.

From my casual conversations during shift changes and with friends, I know I’m not alone in these feelings. I wonder if any of you readers out there might feel the same.

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An article I wrote was just published on a wonderful site called KevinMD. Here’s the link:

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2016/09/helping-hospice-present-much-important-busy.html

As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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When I was first training to be a hospice volunteer (in 2001), one of the most important lessons the leaders drummed into us was the centrality of boundaries. We were reminded repeatedly that we were not a family member, a close friend, or even a not-so-close friend of the residents. In short, we were not in the “inner circle.” That space was reserved for those who were closest to the person who was dying, be they family of origin, by marriage, or by choice. As death grew nearer, we were to maintain a distance, making room for those in the inner circle to spend time with the resident before they died.

I had no problem with this lesson, since I had struggled with boundary issues when my sister was dying and a woman we had hired to assist with her care started to feel that she was as close to Carol (or perhaps even closer!) than we were.

We were also repeatedly instructed about confidentiality and never speaking about what happens in hospice with other people. What wee weren’t really prepared for is how to be when we know one of the people who is admitted to the residence.

As someone who lives in the same neighbourhood as the hospice where I volunteer, it’s perhaps inevitable that people will be admitted with whom I am familiar, whether as neighbours, colleagues, or local activists. When that has happened, I’ve made a mental note in my mind, mostly by way of acknowledging the sorrow and loss they must be facing. I make a point of not indicating I’m familiar with them, out of respect for their privacy and the tremendously challenging circumstances they are facing. I hold them in my heart, and continue with my work both inside and outside of hospice.

A while ago, a woman was admitted with whom I had more than a passing acquaintance. We had been colleagues once upon a time, members of the same neighbourhood, and friends of friends. I was saddened to see that she had been admitted and wondered how I should be. Should I avoid her room as much as possible out of respect to her privacy? Or should I go and greet her and help make her feel welcome?

I chose the latter option, as I knew in my heart it was the right one. I knocked on her door, came to the side of her bed, and said something like, “I’m sorry to see you here – though I’m glad you can be here.” She asked how long I had been volunteering and I told her. And she told me what a wonderful place it was. We spoke for perhaps five minutes, then I left her to rest while her family went to lunch.

For the rest of my shift, family and friends visited her, and I steered clear except to respond to the call bell.

The following week, as so often happens when someone decides to come to hospice, she was much weaker, and a note in the book indicated that only wanted to see her family. Despite my desire to go in and say hello, to offer my “expertise” or “wisdom,” I knew that was much more for my own needs than hers and I resisted.

This is often the litmus test for me when I am facing such a decision at hospice. I ask myself this question: “Are you going to see the resident (or say this brilliant thing) because it will support or help them? Or are you doing it because of a need of your own? To feel helpful and needed. To be validated in some way. To feel connected.”

I really do ponder those questions before going to a room or saying or doing something, especially as a patient nears death. Most of the time, the answer is that I can be of service to the patient, whether by sitting at the bedside when they are alone or singing songs or reading the Bible (or poems or any book that’s evident in their room). And I can feel certain that I am not breaching any boundaries and getting myself “in trouble.”

It’s inevitable that we will meet people we know in the hospice work that we do. Indeed, in rural hospices and small communities, it is unavoidable. The important thing is not that we avoid people we know or pretend we don’t know them. Rather it is respecting the honour and privilege we have been given in being able to accompany people when they are dying. Sometimes that means doing the dishes or making up beds or getting more ice to make ice chips. And sometimes it means making space for family members (supporting them if we can) and respecting their time with the person they love.

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