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http://www.pallimed.org/2017/01/the-dying-dont-need-your-permission-to.html

A couple of weeks ago, I came across this article by hospice social worker, Lizzy Miles. She’s also a blogger, writer, and credited with bringing the first Death Cafe to the United States. This article challenges the widely held view that we should tell a person who is near death that “it’s OK to go.”

As a hospice volunteer for many years, I’ve often heard that advice given to family members and I know that I’ve offered it on a few occasions.

The first person I said those words to was my sister Carol. She was very near death and I was sitting at her bedside, singing softly, holding her hand, speaking quietly. “You’re safe now,” I told her over and over. “It’s OK to go.”

I was operating on instinct more than anything I remember being told.  It just felt right. She’d had such a long struggle, filled with pain and near constant nausea. She was safe now, at the hospital (though she had never wanted to be there), with me by her side as she’d wanted.

And much as I never wanted to let her go, I knew it was time. All the possibilities for a cure had been exhausted. Every remedy for pain relief had been tried. It felt like it was time to let her go. I told her I loved her, that she would always be in my heart, and, hardest of all, that I would be OK. The last thing felt like the farthest thing from anything I felt. I felt like I would never be OK, that I would never get over losing her. Yet, I knew in my heart that I had to tell her I would be alright after she died. That we would all be OK. And I had to let her go.

Recently a family member asked me if she should tell her father it was alright for him to die. She told me her mother had asked her to say that, believing that her father was holding on for her. “What do you think?” she asked me. “Should I tell him?”

I had just read the article a few days before and Lizzy Miles’ advice was fresh in my mind. Still I could hear the daughter’s suffering and I wanted to respond.

After a long minute of silence I said, “I think there does come a time when we need to let go. When we need to reassure the person we love that we’ll be OK, even though we don’t feel like that right now. I think they might need to hear that we’ll be OK, even though our hearts may be broken.”

I don’t know what she told her father, though I know she seemed comforted by my words.

In this world there is so much we can never know. Before my sister died, I called myself the least spiritual person I knew. I almost bragged about it. After she died, I began to speak of death as a mystery, the incomprehensible space between life and no life. My years at hospice have only strengthened that belief in the mystery of life and death.

I speak less now. I listen more. And I grow more at ease with not knowing.

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