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Recently, I gave a talk to the +55 Multi Cultural Seniors’ Club Program at Foster Farm Community Centre. When I walked into the venue, I was a little surprised to hear loud music and to see a group of some 35 people doing dance moves in response to the commands of a very enthusiastic man at the front of the room. Since it was 5 to 11 when I arrived (and my talk was to begin at 11!) I was a little concerned that I might be at the wrong place!

But soon, the instructor gave a command in Chinese, which I gathered was telling people it was time to talk their places at the tables set up around the room. As I looked around, I realized that everyone (with the exception of one table, and they seemed to be Syrian) was Chinese!

I looked at my carefully prepared talk and readings from my book with some amount of trepidation. How would I ever get my message across? Just then, a woman approached me, assuring that she would translate. “Don’t worry,” she said. “I used to work as a translator for many years. It will be fine!!”

And so I began. It was an entirely new experience for me to engage with an audience in two sentence bites. I would say a couple of sentences, or ask a question – then everyone would look to the translator, who would talk for a length of time. Then everyone would nod, or give me a thumbs-up.

Obviously I had to improvise a great deal – the text was abandoned, and on the spot I figured out what were the essential things I wanted to get across to this lively group of 70 and 80 plus year old people.

Every so often, a small group would start talking among themselves and I wondered whether they were talking about me, my talk, or something else entirely. Then I said to myself, does it really matter, as long as they are having a good time?

After the talk was over (and before the Chinese pot-luck feast they had prepared), several people, one by one, came up to speak to me. Some just shook my hand to thank me for coming. One of the few men in attendance told me how important it was to raise these issues of caregiving and end of life with his group! Another woman told me she had been a biology professor and that her mother had died at 104! The woman who had translated told me proudly that she was 85 – and not for the first time, I envied the fact that Chinese people seem to never show their age!

As I packed up my things and prepared to leave, the group resumed their dancing. In the end I think I did make an impression on the audience, and I congratulated myself for being able to dance in the moment!

I hope I get more opportunities to reach out to communities I might never otherwise meet!

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