Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘underserved populations’

On the final day of the International Congress, I attended two sessions about providing palliative care to underserved populations. This term refers to a wide range of people including prisoners, those traditionally referred to as homeless (whether living on the street, in a mission or shelter, or underhoused in precarious housing). What I like about the terms underhoused and underserved is that it removes the automatic judgement so frequently attached to people who lack access to services that most of us take for granted, as if this lack were entirely their fault.

The commitment of the speakers I heard in these sessions reminds me of the words of Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of St. Christopher’s House in London and considered to be the founder of the hospice movement. Her phrase was cited often at the Congress as it is by hospices throughout the world.

“You matter because you are you, and you matter to the end of your life. We will do all we can not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die.” Cicely Saunders

Researchers and palliative care activists Kelli Stajduhar (Victoria), Naheed Dosani (Inner City Health Associates in Toronto and co-founder of the Journey Home Hospice in that city), and Simon Colgan (Alberta Health Services, Calgary) spoke passionately about the work they are doing and what it will take to achiever equality in palliative care access and services in this country. I have heard Dr. Dosani speak before and I would highly recommend that readers familiarize themselves with his work (and hear him speak if you get the chance!) To read about Journey Home, visit their website. https://journeyhomehospice.ca/

All three speakers demonstrated the blatant and sometimes subtle ways in which access to palliative care is denied to people who lack access to housing and other social services. Without a fixed address, for example, people are often denied disability and welfare benefits, as well as a  health care card (which is required to receive provincial health care services). Through the Journey Home Hospice (Toronto), like the Mission Hospice in Ottawa, and May’s Place (in downtown Eastside Vancouver) people who can’t access traditional hospice services can receive the care and dignity to the end of their lives that Dame Cicely Saunders envisioned.

As readers can no doubt tell, I was inspired by the words and work of those who are working to ensure access to hospice palliative care to everyone, regardless of their social status, race, citizenship or nationality. I will be looking for ways to support the amazing work that they do.

Read Full Post »

I promised I would write more about my experiences at the Palliative Care Congress and though it’s been more than the few promised days since I last wrote, I’m determined to document a few of the amazing sessions I attended.

Although I typically seek out sessions on volunteer issues, this time I decided to branch out and seek out sessions on palliative care for underserved population. The first such session was on palliative care during humanitarian crises. Even the title boggled my mind. What must it be like to provide palliative care in the midst of the chaos of war, conflict, forced evacuation?

In the first paper, Dr. Anna Voeuk from the University of Alberta talked about her experiences working in an emergency field hospital in Northern Iraq. Voeuk’s passionate presentation documented the range of crises health care workers faced and the need to triage incoming cases with those who could not be saved being given the designation of black, as workers turned their attention to the cases that might benefit from their care. Voeuk added that her field hospital had decided that no one would be left to die alone – a staff members, ranging from cleaners to physicians, would take turns sitting with a dying person until they passed, a moving example of humanity even in the face of war and mass casualties.

Dr. Voeuk also talked about the need for resilience, flexibility, and creative problem solving in order to meet the needs of their patients. Lacking essential medications and equipment, physicians would improvise to set broken limbs, control pain, and fight infection.

Equally inspiring was the presentation by Dr. Megan Doherty, a pediatric palliative care physician  at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and Ottawa’s Roger Neilson House, who  served for three years in the Rohingya refugee camps in Bengladesh. Doherty described the conditions among the 919,000 Rohingya people, 60 per cent of whom are between the ages of zero and 15. Dr. Doherty continues to divide her time between her work in Ottawa and in Bengladesh, providing training and care under extremely challenging circumstances.

I would have wished for the chance to ask Drs. Voeuk and Doherty what had motivated them to offer their services to humanitarian crises, and what impact these experiences have had on their work back in Canada. The standing room only audience for their presentations was clearly as moved as I was by their contributions and dedication.

In the coming days, I’ll write about the sessions I attended on providing care for underserved populations in Canada.

Read Full Post »

The Haul Out

Considering Seals and Other Shore-Strewn Items

Te Arai Research Group

Palliative Care & End of Life Research - New Zealand

Hospice is Not a Dirty Word

-A Hospice Nurse Speaks

volunteerplaintalk

where volunteer managers talk

Ellen Symons

Poetry, essays, and various forms of nature reports

Last Comforts

Notes from the Forefront of Late-Life Care

offbeatcompassion

Offbeat stories and essays about what people facing loss ponder, value, and believe.

Your Own Good Death

thoughts and experiences from being an End of Life Specialist

Jane Eaton Hamilton

"It was her mouth that had a hand over it, not her eyes." -Jane Eaton Hamilton

Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa Latest News, Breaking Headlines & Sports

BIRTH AND DEATH AND IN BETWEEN

Reflections from my life as a mother, grandmother, midwife, farmer, buddhist, teacher, vagabond and hospice nurse...

The fragile and the wild

Ethics, ecology and other enticements for a stalled writer

Rampant with Memory

completed moments stamped

Heart Poems

How poetry can speak to you

Linda Vanderlee • Living Aligned

Personal, Leadership & Team Development

Writingalife's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

yourcoachingbrain

Just another WordPress.com site

Hospice Volunteering

A blog about volunteering in hospice care

EAPC Blog

The Blog of the European Association for Palliative Care